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? >> and now "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america", i am katty kay. edward snowden trades the transit zone for asylum in russia. ariel castro, the man who abducted three women in ohio, is sentenced to life in prison plus 1000 years. first, he tried to explain himself. he helped announce the royal baby to the world. the palacee you to foot man west become a celebrity in calcutta. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. after a month of hiding out in the transit area of a moscow airport, tonight, former nsa contractor, edward snowden, has granted a years asylum in russia. this has strained relations between moscow and russia. president obama is under pressure to retaliate. an upcoming summit is in question. >> this was the moment this afternoon when edward snowden wearing a black rucksack with his back to the camera climbed into a car and disappeared into russia, the biggest country in the world. he had been stuck in limbo in the transit zone of the airport. he insisted he would not go to america to face trial. me aht, his lawyer showed c
? >> and now, "bbc world news america." president obama cancels a moscow summit with president putin. this after russia grantor -- granted edwards snowden asylum, sending at chill through relations. throughoutg flights the region. it cost billions and has the backing of key countries. inside a project which could power the future. pairs of atoms and infusing them together. this will release more energy. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. today relations between the u.s. and russia and another snack when president obama canceled a planned meeting with president putin in russia next month. this comes just days after russia decided to grant asylum to the former intelligence analyst, edwards noted. -- edward snowden. two towering figures on the world stage. relations between russia and washington have never been more, has hadpresident obama a major diplomatic snub aimed at president putin. edward snowden is at the center of the latest round. the former contractor fled america after leaking government secrets. the u.s. is unhappy after russia g
to the middle east that's different from america. he takes pride in that and on the basis of that he's made allies. to give snowden, a highly symbolic figure given the surveillance issue would have collided with what putin's done in international affairs. but at home he has a political elite. forget society. the political elite didn't want him to make this concession to the united states. >> rose: we conclude with julian guthrie, a journalist who has written a book about larry ellison called "the billionaire and the mechanic." it details the story of his quest for the america's cup. >> and it was expected that larry would partner with a better-known yacht club on san francisco's waterfront, the st. francis yacht club. and there's a fun story in the book about what happened or what didn't happen between the st. francis and larry ellison. but it's a story that doesn't come along very often and i became became very enamored with the drama of the two men before i became interested in the america's cup. >> rose: egypt, russia and the america's cup when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose c
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry you operate in. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america", i am katty kay. edward snowden trades the transit zone for asylum in russia. ariel castro, the man who abducted three women in ohio, is sentenced to life in prison plus 1000 years. first, he tried to explain himself. he helped announce the royal baby to the world. the palacee you to foot man west become a celebrity in calcutta. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. after a month of hiding out in the transit area of a moscow airport, tonight, former nsa contractor, edward snowden, has granted a years asylum in
sought to pursue taking america into the second world war. and as michael explained, that changed the course of history as we know in very dramatic ways and in particular the role of america in very dramatic ways. and so the story is a fascinating one of itself. it's told beautifully by michael in a way that takes you into the rooms where the decisions were being made and the conversations were being had that shaped the course of history. but it also has i think important lessons about statecraft, about the way in which presidents of with great difficulty nevertheless can turn the american state and new and profoundly important directions. therefore it has relevance for today as well. michael was the director of the institute for international policy in sydney australia where he does a great job of leading that institution, which has become under his leadership the premier think tank on international policy and australia. as i said, she was formerly year as a senior fellow in the foreign policy program. he previously directed the global issues program at the institute and before t
coverage of what is happening in the world as well as what is happening in america. from here is a call next alabama. welcome. walter, are you there? you're on the air. i had a brother served in vietnam. realize like going into a rack them of the women, and putting our boys over there and women and the people here were calling in criticizing. if they would take a gun and do something like that, it is different. if it were not for our armed forces, we would be controlled by other countries. just like in the united states, these folk who rob banks or stuff and this that going on all the time. ain't none of us perfect, but i think our soldiers are doing a good job. media,o you think the the usb then, does a good job of covering our efforts in afghanistan and before that to my iraq? host: i sure do. i sure do.ler: host: go ahead. i am a former korean, vietnam veteran, and to make -- to me, the meeting is you have two efferent sides of the story from different angles. i tend to go to the foreign media to see what they think of us. at the same time, i think the lady talked about looking at wh
. >> this international form cannot be violated without consequences. >> america's toughening position as secretary of state john kerry says the u.s. is now all but certain syria has resorted to using chemical weapons. >> new dangers as the nation's biggest forest fire now threatens thousands of buildings, water and energy sources and america's cherished trees. >> a senior muslim brotherhood leader accusing the military run government there are terrorism. >> the secret service agent grabbed her hand and the gun. >> this chilling flashback as former president gerald ford recounts an assassination attempt on his life 30 years ago. ♪ theme >> syria's foreign minister says a potential u.s. strike on syria would serve the interest of groups there in response to a chemical weapons attack that killed 355 people last week in damascus. in a speech moments ago, assad's second in command telling secretary of state john kerr we his regime has not gone against the u.n. investigation. >> it has said that the government used a chemical agent. i categorically deny to mr. kerry, i reiterate there is no single cou
. but parole. within eight years he could be eligible. this person did america a favor by helping out our droops out of iraq and afghanistan, reporting the wars weren't going anywhere as well as the president wanted to us do be. just just like daniel in vietnam and he needs our thanks. >> you recognize size the other side of that as well. >> you couldn't run a government if people were allowed to make these jump little, if we have good internal systems for whistle blowing and a system where you could get off, make it a defense that it was in the public interest. >> thank you for being with us, the senior managing attorney at the certainty for constitutional right here in new york. good to talk to you. flesh. >> you are thanks for having me. >> wild fires burning in the west are now threatening a national treasure. in northern california, a 25 square mile fire is out of control nereo sim at this national park. more than 50 fires are threatening people and property across at least 10 western states, the national i want agency fire center is now at its highest state of alert. that has not ha
. are what the latest polls. a small percentage want their president to act, but about 60% say america should not stay away -- i mean, it should stay away civil war in syria. but there is a statement that obama should do more for the rebels then just send them on, while almost 80%, i should say 90% to not want america to help the opposition. meanwhile, the medical charity doctors without borders say they received more than 3000 patients suffering when the chemical assault happened. 350 people died, but who was behind the attack is still hard to verify. this is the rebel group saying they have got their largest shipment of weapons in the past three days, with the u.s. military buildup in the region. one man says this is not a coincidence. >> we have to see these elements as connected, as related to each other, as a strategy to try to reverse the course that the war has taken, where the government has made very significant gains, and to try to stifle the effort to bring down the independent government of syria. there are a lot of weapons out there in the world. there are rebel groups at this po
to this week in the americas. the u.s. army private bradley man in, what impact did the whistle blower have on america abroad? and negotiating with the colombian rebel group. and the villagers that take on the drug cartels. but first, viewed as a hero by some and a traitor by others, a soldier who blew the whistle on america's military and diplomatic secrets, found guilty of espionage and theft charges, but acquitted of aiding the enemy. >> when carrying out the air raid on baghdad in 2007, these pilots could not have imagined the video would one day be made public. the footage showing the killing of journalists and several other civilians sparking controversy. this is among the data and over by bradley manning and he has been convicted for it. they released a series of top- secret documents just as damaging. hundreds of thousands of diplomatic cables. >> the battlefield consequences are potentially severe and dangerous for our troops, allies, partners, and they will damage our relationships in debt -- a reputation in that part of the world. >> it is clear enemies of the u.s. will take care
targets were in the arab world and in africa, there could also be attacks in europe or north america. now, if it is a global travel alert, then it isn't really a travel, but rather an existence alert. the public announcement had all the hallmarks of the old color-coded alerts of the bush era. threatening enough to make people anxious and vague enough to give them little to do about it. but what about al qaeda? well, al qaeda central, the organization centered in afghanistan and pakistan, is in fact battered and broke. but the idea of al qaeda remains vibrant in some other places. not, as it turns out, in the great hot beds of islamic radicalism such as saudi arabia, but rather in places where the government is so weak it simply cannot control its own territory. yemen, somalia, mali, northern nigeria. so what kind of strategy should the united states pursue against these very small groups in very weak states? there are three possible paths. the first would be a more full bore counterinsurgency strategy, the kind that general david petraeus executed in iraq and to a lesser degree in afghani
invest a lot of money into russia. the british investor a lot of money. if you compare russia and america, who was more friendly to britain, bp is being torn apart in america. bp in russia was given 20% of the biggest oil corporation in the world. >> the reality is there may be concerns over civil liberties and human rights for gay people. at the end of the day, it is about cash. people like bp are not going to pull out of russia because they do not like what president clinton is doing on civil discourse. -- with president putin is doing on civil discourse. >> president could is pragmatic. he despises. he devised the issues -- he divides the issues from real business. western corporations are more than welcome. they appeared to be the first to putin's wrongdoing against civil society in russia. >> societies are struggling to recover economically. are we destined to be -- to be feeling more miserable? the old model in which success in >> to long hours, lack of sleep, and constantly checking e-mail is not working, she believes. we will hear from her in a moment and from the professor who sa
platform for south america. >> translator: if we look at brazil over the long term its economy has a big potential for growth due to its abundant natural resources. we aim to provide a wide range of products for our customers there. >> auto sales in the country are expected to grow further. brazil will host both the 2014 world cup soccer tournament and the 2016 summer olympic games. last year 3.8 million new vehicles were sold in the country. >>> scientists from around the world are planning to create mutant forms of the bird flu virus. they want to fully assess the risks the virus presents. more than 130 people, mostly in eastern china were infected with the virus earlier this year. 43 of them died. a group of 22 scientists including researchers from japan, the united states and britain released a statement. they will modify the genes of the virus. they want to determine what make it more toxic and resistant to antibiotics and transmitted to mammals. the group carried out studies in 2011 but the u.s. tried to stop publication of the results. the government officials allowed the results
south. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >> this is just the beginning of something much bigger. >> thank god i didn't have to suffer what he had to go through. >> this sunday, the premiere of "into eternity". >> i am now in this place where you should never come. >> how do you contain 100,000 years of nuclear danger? >> it is an invisible danger. >> al jazeera america presents "into eternity". premieres sunday night 9 eastern. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> coming up on al jazeera this evening, the lingering problems with nuclear power. every day radioactive wasted from power plants is isolated. the documentary" into eternity" covers the facilities. 100,000 years scientists say living there will need to know about. dangers. >> this is probably the
about it on "good morning america." for the very latest in breaking news, you can always stay with us on twitter at abc 2 news hashtag gmm. >>> 6:45 right now. demonstrations, public outcry and passionate pleas in front of city council did very little for those who are against a tax break for a developer in harbor east. many say this is a bad deal for people who live in the city and city leaders say it has to be done. abc 2 news' roosevelt leftwich is is live to explain. what happens now? >>reporter: well, megan, the votes to bring this package of tax incentives and also tax breaks out of committee was 3- 0. and what it's going to do is is transform this whole entire area here into something completely different for the city, but, however, this vote did not come without a big protest. now, the harbor point project would transform about 27 acres of waterfront property into a new headquarters for exelon corporation and bring in hundreds of apartments along with stores and restaurants. mayor stephanie rawlings blake is currently behind this. she and other supporters of the measure say
the baseballs, there might be no financial crisis. >>> meanwhile, somewhere in america, a deranged woman you probably worked with is now writing her first love letter to ariel castro in prison despite the fact he slut shamed his victims during sentence. we'll uncover the slut shaming from rush limbaugh to castro on tonight's f bomb. today is the birthday of the late jerry garcia, also the birthday of my favorite rapper, public enemy leader chuck d and coolio is 50. how did that happen? i mention the musical artists today because mtv has a birthday they launched on this date in 1981 when the letters in their logo stood for music television. they dropped the words music television in 2010 proving once and for all that mtv now stands for nothing. this is "viewpoint." >> john: good evening, friends, i'm john fuglesang. this is "viewpoint." white house officials and democrats in both houses screamed from the rooftops about how bad sequestration would be. after the g.o.p. rammed it through both houses and john boehner boasted he got 98% of what he wanted, republicans said and i'm paraphrasing here
to a broad swath of america. dr. king's speech was a pointed speech, but a healing speech. dr. king's speech was an important speech, because it charted a vision. i think for the president, and for all of us that are going to participate in after the the activities, we call it a continuation, not just a commemorative series of events, for all of us and for the president i think especially it is about the future. it's about 21st century america, but it's also about a recognition of what i call sinister forces, martin, that are at play in this nation, the discussion about repealing health care, the voter suppression laws that exist, all of this in the face of a great recession in the aftermath of a great recession, when what the nation should really be about is building the kind of bridges we need to build economic prosperity for all. it's important, but it also is a chance action i think, for the president to think beyond his administration, and think beyond his term as president, to set a course which may last for decades to come. >> professor peterson, mark moriel talks about the future, bu
>> welcome to al jazeera america. here is a look at our headlines. the syrian government accused of chemical warfare on its own people, the the opposition group said the government killed hundreds of women and children. former egyptian president hosni mubarak may be released from house arrest within a few hours. and bradley manning sentenced to 35 years behind bars for leaking classified information. now his attorney wants help from the president. [♪ music ] >> we begin tonight with atrocities in syria and accusations of chemical warfare. it could put more pressure on president obama to get involved in the dispute. opposition groups are claiming that the government used chemical weapons in the overnight offensive. we want to warn you that some of the pictures we want to show you are extremely graphic. they show injured people being treated by hospital workers while others lie motionless. activists athey are victims of banned chemical weapons fired by government forces. and other video shows survivors struggling to breathe. al jazeera cannot verify the videos but if proved true
of "collision 2012, obama versus romney" and the future of electi elections in america. thank you for coming here, dan. >> thank you, and dree ya. >> and the fact that you got so many people to speak to you so openly, and going back over the contours of the campaign and the first question is, why was 2012 so different than past campaigns? >> well, for two reasons. one, this was a big moment in american politics, and 2008 election was historic for all of the reasons that we know, but this race was more important and telling about where we are in the politics. i called it "collision 2012" because it was a collision between the america of 2008 that e lekted barack obama and the america of 2010 that swept the republicans into power, and it was a collision of philosophies that were enunciated by governor romney and president obama. and in the end, what it told us about the country is that we are deeply divided and that the election in itself did not resolve many of the questions that were at the center of the debate. >> and do you think that the defining characteristic of this campaign was the ph
are an undocumented worker in america, you are a captive. >>female farm workers empowered to speak out. >> frontline correspondent lowell bergman, in collaboration with univision and the center for investigative reporting, investigate. >> no one's ever been charged for rape or assault? >> no. >> tonight, "rape in the fields." frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, with grants from jon and jo ann hagler on behalf of the jon l. hagler foundation. and scott nathan and laura debonis. >> lowell bergman: there are over a half-million women working in the fields of america. most are undocumented immigrants. this is a story about the price many women pay t
america," and have a wonderful monday. >>> making news in america this morning, expressing optimism. >> fire crews in idaho are feeling better as they battle an enormous wildfire but there's plenty left to do before some ritzy communities are completely safe from the flames. >>> back to court. the murder case involving oscar pistorius takes another step forward. we've got the latest from south africa. >>> 16 years later and still another conspiracy theory about the death of princess diana. special forces, a cover-up and a serious new investigation. >>> a-rod's anger after getting hit as the yankees take on the red sox so who had the last laugh in baseball's fierce evidence rivalry? >>> and good morning, everyone. we begin this monday with crews battling wildfires in 11 western states. >> the biggest fire burning right now threatens thousands of hopes in the idaho resort town of ketchum and sun valley. with more here's wendy gillette. >> reporter: the sky glowed orange in central idaho last night though fire crews say the flames are spreading a little less quickly. firefighters battl
with pakistan and america's uneasy ally calling for an end to drone strikes on its soil. pakistan and the u.s. are opening the dialogue. this relationship has been strainve t u.s. drone program and what the u.s. believes is pakistan's half hearted approaching to cracking down in their borders. secretary of state john kerry is suggesting the program could be winding down adding most of the threat has been eliminated. kerry also said that he believes president obama has a real time line for ending the striem. remarks the state department walked back. u.s. drone strikes killed 8 suspected militants in pakistan. >>> we know it's been a while since we've seen edward snowden. we've gotten a picture of edward snowden. he's a legal resident of russia. he's been granted temporary asylum by moscow. that will allow him to remain in that country for at least a year. yesterday snowden was seen leaving the moscow airport where he was stranded for more than a month. the website wikileaks says he remains with legal advisor sarah harrison and is currently in a secure, confidential location. the u.s. is dema
to 18 years old from new york city. ♪ [ applause ] america's east coast was hit by hurricane sandy last october. in new york alone, more than 50 people died and over 100,000 buildings were damaged. 1-year-old tohar shaniger is the one who wanted to share her disaster experience with japanese children. >> i saw the destruction. and i spoke with families who had lost their homes even halfway across the world were trying to help and we're still lifting spirits, and we feel their pain. >> reporter: they chose "hana wa saku." a song dedicated to the people living in the disaster area. they learned the meaning of the lyrics from a volunteer. >> still there is a flower to bloom in the future. so that's the song. >> reporter: tohar is excited to sing the song for her parents at home before going off to japan. ♪ ♪ >> i guess disasters do happen, but i could also feel the message of don't give up. >> how are you? >> reporter: in july, 40 members visited sendai. ♪ they gave a concert for children at a school. their energetic performers made the children smile and dance. at the end, ypc sang
in the american- russian relationship. and senior fellow ship at the partnership for secure america. was this just for a short time, he is a journalist at the russian service. halfway through this, you are off. we will get your thoughts in a moment. by satellite we have to guess, the director studies at the institute democracy, good to see. in washington d.c., the chief political columnist and one house correspondent for newsmax. what are the issues that could fit into something called human rights under the criminal justice system? your time is scarce. tell us what you have written about its implications and ramifications for all of us. >> i am following this case like you are for several years. each time there's something new, it gets more and more unbelievable if you have read kafka or orwell, this is nothing. they say the russian officials stole 230 million. people put him in prison when he testified and he stayed in prison 358 days after he was tortured and almost died. after this campaign started, the united states and europeans want to maybe discuss it. at the same time, russia saw european
america's most unequal countries. he was sworn in today with a promise to wage war on poverty. >> he is taking office after a turbulent year in paraguay. last june, it was isolated in the region after the controversial impeachment of a former president. now it is hoped he will be built paraguay's links with neighbors. >> paraguay was not allowed to participate in the last summit in july. it was suspended from the alliance last year when they decided the paraguay senate had undemocratically removed the country's president. now paraguay is said to be readmitted to the group, which includes venezuela, brazil, argentina, and uruguay. like the eu, it is a common market, but in south america, political disputes have often hampered free trade. these days, eu nations export nearly 2/3 of their goods to each other. now brazil, south america's biggest economy, is looking to unilaterally strengthen trade ties with the eu, potentially undermining the partnership. >> time to check in with the markets now. we have been watching the days trading in frankfurt. >> traders and frankfurt have a lot of
to the u.s. and james "whitey" bulger, one of america's most notorious underworld bosses, who has been convicted of nearly one dozen murders, racketeering and conspiracy. he terrorized an irish catholic neighborhood in boston as a leader of the winter hill gang. 16ugitive on the run for years, his story even inspired hollywood. 10 mosts on the fbi's wanted list for 16 years. james "whitey" bulger terrorize and irish cap but the motherhood in boston -- irish-catholic andhborhood in the 1970's 1980's. he would pull teeth from victims so that they could not be identified. onh murder and racketeering his rap sheet, even james bulger new the trial was a foregone conclusion. >> he knew as soon as he was arrested he would die behind the walls of a prison or on a gurney getting injected with a chemical -- chemical that would kill him. xp went on the run in 1994. he was captured in 2011 living with his girlfriend. >> what does this have to do with me? >> he was said to be the motivation for a gangster played by jack nicholson. gang was left to his own devices by corrupt agents. >> 31 years afte
are we talking about? we cannot possibly be talking about the united states of america, who have come there history where we've deprived african-americans and others from voting across the globe for preventing folks, yes it seems to me what we're trying to do is take away the right to vote or make it difficult for people to vote. clearly it seems that north carolina is starting it, because north carolina now is in play, as evidenced by the last few president atelection. individuals are trying to systematically eliminate individuals from having the ability to vote. we should be talking about more freedom to vote, having more voter participation, as opposed to less. perhaps more specifically, recently instruct down that central element of the voting rights act, which means it's up to you guys, up to congress to update this law. is any progress being made? are you optimistic that it will be made? >> i know there's problem being made i think what the supreme court did is it just said we have to look at a new try tieria that were affected by the votinging rights act, now you it look at the
the deputy special coordinator for middle east transitions. the author of freedom on steady, the america's response and the role in every democracy. the third speaker at the end is michele dunne and she is vice president at the atlantic council and is there a director of the atlantic council rfik hariri center for middle east. her prior work also includes being the associate at the carnegie endowment for international peace, a visiting assistant professor at georgetown and the middle east specialist at the united states state department. while the state department she assumed many roles and assignments including the director of middle east and africa, the u.s. embassy and egypt and the national security staff. she was also the u.s. secretary of state policy planning staff member, the u.s. consulate general in jerusalem, and she was also with the bureau of intelligence and research. as you can see we have a wonderful team of experts who are going to answer the questions and on what is happening in egypt. so if you could help me warm them. [applause] >> thanks, monica. i'm going to start w
public support here, just as in america, i saw a report revealing that reuters is saying there's only 9% public support in the united states for intervention. there's no great grounds for the support here saying we should go into syria. memories long lasting and people recall what happened in iraq. the fear here was this would begin a slippery slope into more in depth military action. certainly the opposition, who put the amount to all this certainly is getting an awful lot of bad press from downing street and the foreign office this morning. >> what could it possibly mean in the region, what would be implications be if the u.s. goes it alone, initiates its own strike in syria? >> i think that the way the britain and america acted together, ile have similar implications for the region, you will have a destabilizing effect, military intervention in another middle eastern country, using w.m.d. as a pretext. that will clearly have implications. it will upset the delicate relationship between the united states and russia, where the president is heading in the next couple of days and certain
there. what is great about what we've seen with america over the last several years is how resilient we are. after the boston bombings, for example. the next day, folks are out there, going to ball games, making sure we are not reacting in a way that somehow shuts us down. >> right. >> and that is the right reaction. terrorist depend on the fact we will be terrorized. we are going to live our lives and the odds of people dying in a tourist attack are still a lot ,ower than in a car accident unfortunately, but there are things we can do to make sure that we're keeping the pressure on these networks, that will try to injure americans. it is the first thing i think of when i wake up in the last thing i think about before going to bed, is keeping americans safe. host: that was the president last night on "the tonight show" with jay leno. ken walsh has written this piece available online that the president's appearance on "the tonight show", part of his effort to expand the presidencies outreach more widely than ever. other presidents have limited themselves to more traditional approaches su
which america could take military action in syria this as calls grow to forcefully respond to evidence that the assad regime killed hundreds of its own people with chemical weapons. >>> the wildfire the size of the chicago raging in and around a cherished american landmark, the yosemite national park but the rim fire poses a threat to hundred of thousands of residents in san francisco and it is a 150 miles away. we'll tell you about that. >>> sentencing for the army major convicted of killing 13 people in the fort hood shooting massacre the will nidal hasan get life in prison or the death penalty. but first right now, brand new stories. >> inyou had concluding this one, jon, busted for buging? a new report says the nsa cracked videoconferencing system at u.n. and apparently that is not all. >>> plus jody arias is back before a judge. today we could learn when the retrial of the convicted killer's penalty phase will begin. >>> and there is talk about making an entrance? bandits storm a pawn shop. why what they got away with has police very worried. it is all happing right now. jon: good
carney said, america responding to an action that need their response. to restore credibility. the third is to alter the balance of forces between the regime to set conditions for evil -- either a diplomatic settlement or options of the three or, finally, a decapitation and regime change although jay carney says it is off the table because we are not seeking a regime change. even trying to alter the balance of forces is something in which the administration is not likely to pursue. other than making a statement, i think the likely minimal goal of any kind of military action would be to restore credibility and deter future chemical weapons use. how might we go about achieving this? the first thing that is important to say that based on newspaper descriptions of the kind of strike we can expect, and they are talking about the class destroyers in the east mediterranean being the likely source of the strike, each of them carries a couple dozen tomahawk land attack missiles and they're probably accompanied by one or two attack submarines and they have potentially much larger numbers of tomaha
>> it was great to have you here, kelly. >> great to be here. >> america live starts right now. >> we start this hour with a fox news alert. less than two hours away from president obama's first formal solo news conference since april, a look for you in the white house. reporters expected to pepper him with questions about his decision not to meet with russian president vladimar putin and the administration's continued use of the controversial talking point. i am jamie colby. >> and i am greg jarret. >> they are focusing on law makers wasting time and attention on phony scandal instead of the people's work. >> to often over the past two years, washington took its eye off of the ball. they have allowed political postural and phony scandal to distract from our economy and growing middle-class. >> fox news poll find that people do not agree with the president. the interest in the benghazi terrorist attack is anything but phony and not phony to voters, nsa snooping on americans. and the justice department seizing telephone records and irs targeting conservative groups for extra scr
. and this was a six-year-old when he came to america. this is him now. elaine quijano on how an afghan boy got his childhood back. uijaw captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. this is the "cbs evening news" wi >> schieffer: good evening. scott's on assignment. i'm bob schieffer. three young women were held captive for a decade in a dilapidated cleveland house where they were repeatedly raped and abused. but ariel castro, the man who pleaded guilty to the crime, said today it was everybody's fault but his and claimed the women were actually happy. judge michael russo was not convinced. he sentenced castro to life in prison without parole, plus 1,000 years. dean reynolds is at the courthouse. >> reporter: a shackled ariel castro scanned the courtroom today for a familiar face. there was at least one, michelle knight, one of the three women he imprisoned in his home fair decade of sexual and emotional brutality. she told the court and castro what it was like living in that house with its windows boarded up, trip alarms on the doors, the heavy chains, the pole th
. >> these people have the best health care coverage in america, people in administration on capitol hill give themselves everything. of course they don't want to go to something. >> you know what, they are not the only people that feel this way. look at the union. you know what the health bill is? you ever go to the gas station late at night and that rotating machine of hot dogs and that one hot dog, that is the health care bill. everybody looks at the hot doll and they go i'm not eating that hot dog. >> you take it. >> i do take it but for other reasons. health care is hated by everybody and nobody wants to admit it. obama nominated john as the new head of the irs. he is an expert in turning this institution around because it is in need of reform. why would you need reform if it was a phony scandal. apparently, it is not a phony scandal. calling the irs a phony scandal is like calling ariel castro a misunderstood boyfriend. >> i think i liked you better with the shades yesterday. >> shutup. >> here is the deal. the union will help get obama care pushed through. now they don't want to be part
>>> good morning, america. high alert. the terror threat right now, causing a mass closing of many of america's largest embassies around the world. more than a dozen closing their doors this weekend, as officials try to figure out the exact target at this hour. >>> the emotional and dramatic showdown between a victim and her kidnapper. >> after 11 years, i am finally being heard. >> michelle knight's courageous face-off with the monster who held her captive for more than a decade. how she got through it. and how she's moving forward with her life. >>> and the flash flood emergency in the south. a 5-year-old sucked into this drainpipe. lucky to be alive after being washed 300 yards under an entire neighborhood. these camp counselors rescued when this stream became a raging river in just seconds. and there's more rain on the way. ♪ let's go >>> and let's go! the sun is shining here for "gma's" huge party in the park. r&b superstar, ne-yo, rocking the stage live in central park, right now. >>> if i didn't know any better, i'd guess robin and george were there in that crowd right now
how to handle the protection of health in america. the public health agencies of the state level. i saw a tremendous opportunity and omb didn't care that much about what i was doing over the department. so they gave me a lot of flexibility to build the local and state public health systems. so we put a tremendous amount of money in that. then anthrax came and nobody the was worried about the threat came and since homeland security hadn't been created the department of health and human services was the place to go. so everybody gave up pretty much a blank check to develop the public health system. on the food safety if you remember correctly i was very passionate about the food safety as i figured the was the next place all over america and we were supposed to protect 80% of the food under our jurisdiction to you go see a tremendous possibility. we would put a lot of money into that and then we also had a president by the name of cheney who felt that it was absolutely necessary to ratch all of the protections we possibly could, and so it was pretty much put the money in the pot of he
to contemplate. at last count there were 3.6 million front line cashiers, cook and crew in america's fast food industry. a living wage would eliminate 3.6 million poor people. that's the kind of thing hitler used to talk about. if only someone had been around give him a happy meal. layoff laugh and i'm not the only one with maximum rage over the minimum wage, so is fox news anchor and burst tube of pillsbury crescent rolls so is neil cavuto. >> diever tell you when i was a kid you would be grateful for any job you could find. now a lot of kids turn up their noses at fast food jobs and go begging at $11. a lot of folks would be happy with any wage, any time. >> stephen: neil and i are not fixated on our hourly wage. i don't know what i make an hour. that many zeros gives me vertigo. i want to support him in my new segment, "rich white guys agreeing with each other." ( cheers and applause ) folks, if you're out of work, you get up off your sesame seed buns and take anything you can get. just listen to neil's inspiring story. >> all i know is as soon as i turned 16 and heard that a fast food cha
alone america. obama, call him a liberal or what you want but he was not on the fringe. he was down the plate of the democratic party. you have guys who are both not ready and also taking really wacko bird positions to -- >> at the same time, a lot of that has to do with the fact where you live and what your views are. there are a lot of people in middle america that don't see ted cruz or rand paul or marco rubio out of the mainstream. a lot of people. as many people don't think they are, as people don't think barack obama is. i mean barack obama -- >> they're not even in the mainstream of the republican party. barack obama was in the mainstream of the democratic party. he may have been inexperienced. >> when these guys came in 2010 they are in the mainstream of the republican party. look at the fact that in 2010 it's not like there were a couple people that snuck. >> office. republicans won the largest legislative landslide on the state and national level i think probably in the 20 -- in a century. it was a remarkable victory for them. the problem that some of them don't understand
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